Thyca Denies the Existence of “Overdiagnosis” in a Public Statement

Over the past couple of weeks, print and television media have carried several stories about the overdiagnosis of thyroid cancer.  These stories were precipitated by an article about thyroid cancer in the New England Journal of Medicine which was published on August 18, 2016.  The article, Worldwide Thyroid Cancer Epidemic? The Increasing Impact of Overdiagnosis, was written by Salvatore Vaccarella, Ph.D., Silvia Franceschi, M.D., Freddie Bray, Ph.D., Christopher P. Wild, Ph.D., Martyn Plummer, Ph.D., and Luigino Dal Maso, Ph.D. They are epidemiologists from the World Health Organization’s International Agency for Research on Cancer in Lyon, France, and also the Cancer Epidemiology Unit of the Aviano National Cancer Institute in Aviano, Italy.

Their study found that more than 470,000 women and 90,000 men may have been overdiagnosed with thyroid cancer from 1987 to 2007, and articles and news reports appeared in many publications and television programs including NBC Nightly News.  Gina Kolata, of the New York Times, who had recently written another article about the NIFTP reclassification , has also written an article on the new study.  In the midst of all this media attention, The American Thyroid Association issued a statement in reference to the many articles and reports which appeared.  In their statement, the ATA appeared to endorse the conclusion of the NEJM article:

The AMERICAN THYROID ASSOCIATION recognizes that the recent increase in incidence of thyroid cancer in the United States and other countries is, in large part, due to the diagnosis of indolent papillary microcarcinomas that will never result in symptoms or death, and which only rarely will enlarge or spread beyond the thyroid gland. The issues surrounding this problem are twofold: First, medical imaging is identifying small nodules, many that are not clinically significant. Second, these small nodules are subjected to ultrasound-guided FNA, and about 5% reveal cancer cells. The usual next step is surgical removal, often followed by radioactive iodine and life-long thyroid hormone therapy. This approach is costly, creates risks from the treatments, and in most patients offers little or no benefit.

The ATA published a link to this  statement on their Facebook page. It was posted alongside a link to the NBC News report about the overdiagnosis of thyroid cancer, leaving little doubt about ATA endorsement of the study from the World Health Organization which had been published by the New England Journal of Medicine.  The NEJM article, along with the statement from the American Thyroid Association probably represent the most resounding statements yet from influential medical organizations in favor of the overwhelming evidence that thyroid cancer is being overdiagnosed.

On August 19th, THYCA, the Thyroid Cancer Survivor’s Association, which has been previously mentioned on this blog, issued a statement about the “overdiagnosis” articles which had appeared in the media.  Written by Gary Bloom, a survivor of papillary thyroid cancer and the executive director of the organization, the statement appeared on Twitter, Facebook, and THYCA’s website. It opens by asserting:

A number of news articles have recently emerged characterizing the epidemic of thyroid cancer as “overdiagnosis,” typically in reference to papillary microcarcinomas, which are small cancers. ThyCa: Thyroid Cancer Survivors’ Association, Inc. (www.thyca.org), and many of the thousands of survivors we work with, are troubled by this characterization.

The point of these articles should be about the question of treatment, and potentially over-treatment. It is erroneous to classify the situation as one of overdiagnosis, and, more importantly, it is inappropriate to downplay the diagnosis of cancer to the public and those in the health care field. Knowledge is power, and even people with smaller cancers deserve to know what is going on with their bodies.

With his characterization of the concept of “overdiagnosis” as erroneous, Bloom seemed to be taking on the New England Journal of Medicine, the World Health Organization, and The American Thyroid Association in one fell swoop of denial.  For a long time, there have been feelings of anger within the thyroid cancer patient community over the dismissal of thyroid cancer as “the good cancer” by medical professionals, and by extension the mass media and the general public.  THYCA has worked to change this perception with various public campaigns. The characterization of thyroid cancer as “the good cancer” most likely emerged because of the excellent prognosis for most (but not all) thyroid cancers. Only recently has there been a recognition “from within” by endocrinologists and surgeons, that doctors should not refer to any cancer as being “good” to their patients.  For example, an editorial was published on this topic by Future Endocrinology in April of this year.

Whether the “good cancer” label is employed because of  over-confidence by doctors in their own interventions, thereby creating an under appreciation of the natural history of papillary thyroid cancer; or perhaps even due to the sexism of many physicians towards their predominantly female population of patients is not entirely clear.  However, the feelings and experiences of thyroid cancer patients have received a great deal of attention in medical journals over the past two or three years.  The dominant finding of most of these academic articles have contradicted  popular perceptions about thyroid cancer.  In fact,  the research has shown that patients suffer both psychologically and physically at a level on par with those who have cancers which are statistically more lethal.  Therefore, an obvious problem of the “overdiagnosis” narrative is that it appears to marginalize thyroid cancer patients at just the time their disease was seemingly gaining greater respect.

It’s deeply questionable, however, whether THYCA’s statement denying “overdiagnosis” will ultimately help this organization or the patients which is serves, especially because most patients being diagnosed today have “small” thyroid cancers.  The overdiagnosis of thyroid cancer, by all appearances, has been accepted as fact by both the World Health Organization and the American Thyroid Association.  Will denying it as a fact make THYCA appear to be anti-science?   Will THYCA now be able to help future patients by providing an unbiased source of information about incidental or non-palpable thyroid cancers?   These are troubling questions that will not be easily answered.

 

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